• louise harper

Giant Crochet Virus Pattern

Viruses have been around forever, they haven't just sprung up this past year. They have been lingering and making humans ill since before we even evolved into humans. Just because one is more viral and disruptive than others doesn't make it the most worrisome or important (in terms of scientific discovery, that is!).


That said, Coronavirus is going to have a massive impact on all of humanity and our history. I have been amusing myself during lockdown, not just with constant crocheting and knitting, but with the idea of kids in 50 years time having homework assignments to "find out what it was like in the lockdown of 2020" and working out what I would say. What would you tell them?


Another way I have kept myself occupied is by making a giant virus that now sits on my sofa! Sometimes I have found that having a giant stress ball around is particularly useful! It's also just the right size to hug when you are missing the people you love. I know that lockdown is easing and that it is possible to go visit people now, but this virus is still going to have an impact! Whether that's changing the entire way we work, increased anxiety about going out in public places, or postponing your wedding (Thanks Coronavirus!); I think my giant stress ball virus is going to be sitting on my sofa for quite a while yet!





I made my giant virus with 3 strands of double knit yarn and used various yarns from my stash - when I started this it was tricky to get hold of new yarn! The body is made up of blues and greys and greens. The spike glycoproteins are made up of 2 strands of a super bright orange and one strand of yarn that is mostly red but has occasional rainbows in it.


To create the body of your very own giant virus:

using 3 strands of do yarn and a 5mm hook - 6sc into a magic loop (6)

increase in each stitch around (12)

*increase, sc* around (18)

*increase, 2sc* around (24)

*increase, 3sc* around (30)

*increase, 4sc* around (36)

*increase, 5sc* around (42)

*increase, 6sc* around (48) ---- This round is where the glycoproteins are attached, you can leave a stitch marker if you like to help you work out where they need to go

*increase, 7sc* around (54)

*increase, 8sc* around (60)

*increase, 9sc* around (66)

*increase, 10sc* around (72)

sc in each stitch around (72) repeat for 5

sc in each stitch around (72) ---- sc in each stitch around (72) repeat for 5

sc in each stitch around (72) repeat for 5

*decrease, 10sc* around (66)

*decrease, 9sc* around (60)

*decrease, 8sc* around (54)

*decrease, 7sc* around (48) ---- This round is where the glycoproteins are attached, you can leave a stitch marker if you like to help you work out where they need to go

*decrease, 6sc* around (42)

*decrease, 5sc* around (36) *decrease, 4sc* around (30)

stuff the body to desired squishiness level *decrease, 3sc* around (24) *decrease, 2sc* around (18)

*decrease, sc* around (12)

decrease in each stitch around (6) finish of leaving a long tail and close up the hole





Glycoproteins are present on lots of different cells, even the ones that make up your own body. They are how cells interact and communicate with one another. In terms of viruses, these squiggly spikes are the part of the virus that binds with the host cell.


I made 12 glycoproteins for my virus and stitched them on; 4 evenly spaced around round 8, 4 evenly spaced (and lining up with the previous 4) around round 24, and the final 4 evenly spaced around the middle. The 4 glycoproteins around the middle do not line up with the 4 at the top and bottom.




To create a glycoprotein:

using 3 strands of double knit yarn and a 5mm hook - 6sc into magic loop

sc in each stitch around (6) repeat for 2 more rows

In BLO sc in each stitch around (6)

sc in each stitch around (6) repeat for 8 more rows

finish off, leaving a long tail for sewing to the body and push some stuffing inside the spike.


Reattach the three strands of yarn to the front loops of round 4 (either with a standing sc, or by slip stitching and chaining 1)

increase in each stitch around (12)

increase in each stitch around (24)

increase in each stitch around (48)

increase in each stitch around (96)

increase in each stitch around (192)


weave in your ends and stitch to the virus body - I found it was more productive to work in groups of 4. Once I finished 4 glycoproteins I stitched them to the body, that way I could break up those almost endless feeling hyperbolic stitches, and got to see the progress I was making!


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